Douglas A4 Skyhawk

USN aviation Light Assault Jet. Produced 1954-1979 - 2,960 Made.

The first Grumman Jet Fighter


The Douglas A-4 Skyhawk is a renowned carrier-capable light attack aircraft developed by Douglas Aircraft Company in the early 1950s. Design and Development: Designer: Ed Heinemann, a famed aircraft designer, led the development of the Skyhawk. First Flight: The prototype flew for the first time on June 22, 1954.

Design Features:
Delta Wing: The Skyhawk features a low-mounted delta wing without complex folding mechanisms, which simplified construction and maintenance. Compact Size: Known for its small size, the A-4 was dubbed "Heinemann's Hot Rod" for its sleek design and agility. Speed and Range: Powered by a single turbojet engine, it could achieve speeds of up to 670 mph (1,080 km/h) and had a range of over 2,000 miles (3,200 km) with drop tanks.
Armament: Equipped with two 20mm cannons and capable of carrying a variety of bombs, rockets, and missiles on its five hardpoints.

Operational History:
U.S. Navy and Marine Corps: The Skyhawk served prominently in the Vietnam War, performing ground-attack missions and playing a key role in the U.S. Navy's air operations.

Notable Users:
Blue Angels: The U.S. Navy's flight demonstration squadron flew the A-4 from 1974 to 1986. International Service: Besides the U.S., the Skyhawk was used by several other countries, including Argentina, Israel, Australia, and New Zealand. Combat Roles:
Ground Attack: Primarily designed for close air support and ground attack missions.
Nuclear Capable: It was one of the first aircraft designed to deliver nuclear weapons from aircraft carriers.
Versatility: The Skyhawk's adaptability allowed it to serve in various roles, including training, aerial refueling (with buddy stores), and even as an adversary aircraft for training purposes.

Variants

  • A-4B: An improved version with a more powerful engine and better avionics.
  • A-4C: Featured upgraded radar and bombing systems.
  • A-4E/F: Included further avionics enhancements, more powerful engines, and additional hardpoints.
  • A-4M: Developed specifically for the U.S. Marine Corps with advanced avionics and increased survivability features.
  • TA-4: A two-seat trainer version used for training pilots.
Legacy: Longevity: The A-4 Skyhawk remained in production until 1979, with nearly 3,000 units built. Service Life: Many Skyhawks remained in active service well into the late 20th and early 21st centuries, particularly in foreign air forces. Influence: The aircraft's design influenced subsequent attack aircraft and left a lasting legacy in military aviation history. Modern Usage: Adversary Training: Some A-4s continue to be used for training purposes, particularly in adversary roles to simulate enemy aircraft in training exercises. The A-4 Skyhawk is celebrated for its robust design, versatility, and significant contributions to various military operations over its extensive service life.

Work in Progress, release planned 2025

Development

(To Come)

Design



(To come)

⚙ Douglas A4 Skyhawk specifications

Gross Weight9,853 lb (4,469 kg)/16,216 lb (7,355 kg)
Max Takeoff weight24,500 lb (11,113 kg)
Lenght40 ft 1.5 in (12.230 m)
Wingspan27 ft 6 in (8.38 m)
Height15 ft 2 in (4.62 m)
Wing Area260 sq ft (24 m2)
EnginePratt & Whitney J52-P-6A turbojet engine, 8,500 lbf (38 kN) thrust
Top Speed, sea level
Cruise Speed585 kn (673 mph, 1,083 km/h) at sea level
Range1,008 nmi (1,160 mi, 1,867 km)
Climb Rate5,750 ft/min (29.2 m/s)
Ceiling(to come)
Armament2× 20 mm (0.79 in) Colt Mk 12 cannon, 8,500 lb (3,900 kg) hardpoints.
Crew1 pilot

Combat Records


Gallery:
A4C va94 CVAN-65 USS Enterprise


A4G Skyhawk VF805 HMAS Melbourne 1980


A4U Skyhawk from Brazil

Photos









Videos:

The Models Corner:

-To come

Sources













WW1

Merch


Seafire Mark 45; HMS Pretoria Castle


Zeros vs its aversaries


Aichi D3A “Val” Junyo


Mitsubishi A5M poster


F4F wildcat


Macchi M5


SBD Dauntless Coral Sea


SBD Dauntless USS Enterprise


SBD-4 CV22